Trash cooking

Cooking with trash – ending food waste interview

With respect for the environment and control of our economy as two central issues today, this technique was born, which consists of reusing leftovers to prepare other dishes or take advantage of parts that were often thrown away.
In the midst of the environmental wave and a growing awareness of savings, a trend was born in the culinary world that goes hand in hand with these recently mentioned: “trash cooking”. With a strong imprint of our grandmothers’ cooking, this technique consists of reusing leftovers to prepare other dishes or to take advantage of parts that were often thrown away.
It was a typical practice of the post-war period or of humble families. As the popular saying goes, “even the pig’s feet are used,” and that is exactly what it was all about: getting the most out of the food they had. Today, this situation has changed and two central issues have come into focus: respect for the environment and control of our economy. In a fully industrial world, we have become accustomed to buying and throwing away food without control, even without being aware of it.

Hot trash cooking show- asparagus soup

Trash cooking is a cooking technique where leftovers are used or cooked with the leftovers that usually remain in a house or a restaurant, that is to say, what used to be called “waste cooking”. Inventing new recipes with what we have left over from the previous day or, as is currently fashionable in restaurants, taking advantage of parts that were previously thrown away.
Cooking with waste is a trend that has more and more followers, especially in the world of catering. These, motivated by the crisis, have begun to observe what before would go to the trash can or what was separated from the cutting board, but although it may seem something new, in its own way the trash-cooking is common in oriental cuisine, where it is normal to consume the whole product and the integral use of food.

Ep. 13: ¡la primera vez que mi hermana cocina con basura!

Más de 200 recetas y 45 fotografías a todo color celebran 25 años de buen comer en este original clásico de la cocina regional sureña.Hace un cuarto de siglo, mientras muchos estaban ocupados adoptando las sofisticadas técnicas y los saludables ingredientes de la nueva cocina, un leal sureño reunió con cariño más de 200 recetas -recopiladas desde Virginia Occidental hasta Cayo Hueso- mostrando las tradiciones culinarias y de hospitalidad consagradas por el estilo de la basura blanca. El muy imitado estilo de prosa de Ernie Mickler acompaña a delicias como Tutti’s Fancy Fruited Porkettes, Mock-Cooter Stew y Oven-Baked Possum; acompañamientos incondicionales como Bette’s Sister-in-Law’s Deep-Fried Eggplant y Cracklin’ Corn Pone; platos que no se desperdician, como Four-Can Deep Tuna Pie y Day-Old Fried Catfish; y postres con una fuerte pizca de Dixie, como Don’t-Miss Chocolate Dump Cake de Irma Lee Stratton y Charlotte’s Mother’s Apple Charlotte.
Más de 200 recetas y 45 fotografías a todo color celebran 25 años de buen comer en este clásico de la cocina regional sureña.Hace un cuarto de siglo, mientras muchos estaban ocupados adoptando las técnicas sofisticadas y los ingredientes saludables de la nueva cocina, un leal sureño reunió con cariño más de 200 recetas -recopiladas desde Virginia Occidental hasta Cayo Hueso- mostrando las tradiciones culinarias y de hospitalidad consagradas por el tiempo de la basura blanca. El muy imitado estilo de prosa de Ernie Mickler acompaña a delicias como Tutti’s Fancy Fruited Porkettes, Mock-Cooter Stew y Oven-Baked Possum; acompañamientos incondicionales como Bette’s Sister-in-Law’s Deep-Fried Eggplant y Cracklin’ Corn Pone; platos que no se desperdician, como la tarta de atún en cuatro latas y el bagre frito del día; y postres con una fuerte pizca de Dixie, como la tarta de chocolate de Irma Lee Stratton y la Charlotte’s Mother’s Apple Charlotte.

Cooking with trash

Changes in society, now more informed and interested in the origin of the products they consume, have had an impact on people’s diets. They are looking for healthier foods, of recognized origin and techniques such as trash cooking.
The ‘trash cooking’ is widely used in oriental cuisine and has more and more followers around the world, including high-level restaurants, where the cuisine of use has become an art.
This trend not only involves economic savings, since the idea is to make the most of the product, but also a saving of resources in general, which makes it a more sustainable trend.

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